Hkhagoroloi Bohu Door (1995)

Remember Kammo, man is forgiven every sin. But no trespass by a woman is ever tolerated.

27 Down (1974)

It is no exaggeration to say that Sanjay’s life is dominated by the railways. His father is an engine driver. He plays on the tracks as a child and later jettisons his dreams of becoming an artist to join the railways as a ticket conductor. Sanjay prefers to sleep on the steel berths of a train rather than in the room he rents on the outskirts of Mumbai. In between his long distance railway duty, he meets a woman on a local train. Shalini lives near an important local rail junction Kurla. Their dates often take place at the railway canteen. When their relationship comes undone, Sanjay returns to the womb as it were—her jumps onto the 27 Down and heads to Varanasi. The film could have just as appropriately been called Train Wreck. The film’s director, Awtar Krishna Kaul, working with acclaimed cinematographer Apurba Kishore Bir shoots entirely on location and captures unforgettable documentary-style images of local and long distance travel. The high-contrast, black and white camerawork pays rich dividends in a memorable top-angle sequence of a train pulling into an empty CST platform and disgorging its passengers. Mumbai’s famous (some would say notorious) local trains have always carried more people than they should, even back then in 1974. It’s safe to say that the director would have made more interesting films had he not died while trying to save somebody from drowning shortly before the film was released. Kaul left behind a film that questions the idea of the train as sign of industrial progress. For Sanjay, the moving bogies constitute a journey into nowhereness. 

—Nandini Ramnath, WORLD FILM LOCATIONS: Mumbai

Aadmi ki Aurat Aur Anya Kahaniyan, The Man’s Woman and Other Stories (2009)

mizoguchi yeah !!!! i/a!!! after reading about that there so many things abt the film that changed for me

mizoguchi it makes sense that the official english title was “the wedding day” instead of 22nd day !

Baishey Shravana literally means the twenty-second day of the Bengali calendar month of Shravana. It is the date on which Rabindranath Tagore breathed his last. Ever since, it has become a day of mourning in Bengal. But for Sen, the date had become a reminder of the unforgettable sight he had witnessed at Nimtala Ghat when thousands of uncaring mourners had crushed under their feet the body of a dead child. The scene had haunted Sen for years. Even today he can recollect the grief stricken face of the shocked father. He had often wondered what actually happened—did the father ever locate the body of his child? Did he wait through the night hoping to cremate his son? Sen had no answer to his silent queries, and that had made him restive. He could not understand why we all had become so insensitive to somebody’s personal tragedy in the face of an event of national importance. Baishey Shravana in Sen’s film merely happens to be the wedding day of an ill-fated couple, the man too old, the wife too young, both struggling to adjust with each other in their own way. Abject poverty in the face of a famine, and a desperate attempt to cling to their lost glory lead to the wife’s suicide on their wedding anniversary. In their life and death, Tagore was of no relevance! 

The film released on 13 May 1960, exactly a year before the birth centenary celebrations of Tagore, when the entire country was gearing up for the big event. Most people who came to see the film expected that it would be related to his death, or that it would be based on some gems of his creation. To their shock, they saw a film based on poverty, famine, death, destruction, and a total erosion of human values. Nothing could have been more un-Tagorean and even the venerable members of the Censor Board in Calcutta felt uneasy about it. They requested Sen to change the title to 21st or 23rd of Shravana as a mark of respect to Tagore. But Sen stood his ground insisting that Tagore’s death could not be the only event of consequence on that date.

—Dipankar Mukhopadhyay, MRINAL SEN: 60 Years In Search Of Cinema

*marries the 1st person who gives me an invite for banglatorrents*

pyotra:

one day before the rainy season
alton ellis — what does it take (to win your love)
etta james — my funny valentine
celia cruz — me voy a pinar del rio
miriam makeba — milélé 
hemanta mukherjee — ei raat tomar hamar
bebo valdés & idania valdés — sabor a mí
pharoah sanders — shukuru
tomas mendez / caetano veloso — cucurrucucú paloma
the original orchestra — winter ballad
max roach & abbey lincoln — lonesome lover
mukesh — kai baar yun bhi dekha hai
jho archer — non fond bois
teresa teng — the moon represents my heart
asha bhosle — aage bhi jaane na tu
marpessa dawn — le petit quica
yamashita yôsuke trio —ウミツバメ
celia cruz & carlos argentino — mi amor buenas noches
lata mangeshkar — aa jaane jaan
roger colas — te queiro
asha puthli — say yes
miriam makeba — love tastes like strawberries
bertha dupuy — total
manna dey — hoyto tomari jonno

pyotra:

one day before the rainy season

  1. alton ellis — what does it take (to win your love)
  2. etta james — my funny valentine
  3. celia cruz — me voy a pinar del rio
  4. miriam makeba — milélé 
  5. hemanta mukherjee — ei raat tomar hamar
  6. bebo valdés & idania valdés — sabor a mí
  7. pharoah sanders — shukuru
  8. tomas mendez / caetano veloso — cucurrucucú paloma
  9. the original orchestra — winter ballad
  10. max roach & abbey lincoln — lonesome lover
  11. mukesh — kai baar yun bhi dekha hai
  12. jho archer — non fond bois
  13. teresa teng — the moon represents my heart
  14. asha bhosle — aage bhi jaane na tu
  15. marpessa dawn — le petit quica
  16. yamashita yôsuke trio —ウミツバメ
  17. celia cruz & carlos argentino — mi amor buenas noches
  18. lata mangeshkar — aa jaane jaan
  19. roger colas — te queiro
  20. asha puthli — say yes
  21. miriam makeba — love tastes like strawberries
  22. bertha dupuy — total
  23. manna dey — hoyto tomari jonno